NZ code for cyclists

Cycling is a great way to get around and a sport enjoyed by more than a million New Zealanders.

If only three in 100 people took up cycling instead of driving, New Zealand would save more than 1 billion dollars per year!

Cycling is a great way to get around and a sport enjoyed by more than a
million New Zealanders.

Now available online NZ Code for Cyclists

Bike Code
If only three in 100 people took up cycling instead of driving, New Zealand
would save more than 1 billion dollars per year!

Cycling is the pollution solution that improves your health, increases your
productivity at school or work, and enhances the safety of your community.

Every time you ride, you have an opportunity to help encourage a cycle
friendly culture. Don’t underestimate the impact that a wink or a smile and a
wave can have on motorists’ attitudes to cyclists.

Practice your skills and take care of your bike following this code, and enjoy a
lifetime of cycling through beautiful New Zealand.

Full review at the CAN Library.

The official New Zealand code for cyclists High resolution

The official New Zealand code for cyclists Low resolution

 

 

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Comments

I've only had a brief flick through this, it is impressive and I'm pleased with the scope. However are there changes? I noticed one example, that of moving into the main traffic stream when going through an intersection. You do this rather than just staying in the secondry position.

Just wondering why the sudden shift to take the lane/get into primarly position? Is it to stop potential car impacts, when passing through a junction, from the left? (It's happened to me), I am wondering if the secondry position is ok why leave it and be forced to make two extra adjustments, which will need two shoulder checks and two signals, I'm not keen on performing all this when all I want to do is safely get through the junction.

Will take a better look tonight.

Good question Rob. This recommendation is drawn from John Franklin's text Cyclecraft.
Primary position deters left turning following traffic from cutting you up.
It also aids visibility and conspicuity. i.e. see and be seen.
You also need to be in primary position if turning right.